47 Sugar Work

Wearing gloves, pour sugar that has been cooked to 312 degrees F over parchment paper that has been crinkled, smoothed and rubbed with alcohol to create a light layer of sugar with loose, free bubbles. Another method is to spread glucose on a silicone mat and bake in a low-temperature oven until crisp, bubbly, and set.
Attaching sugar pieces by melting a small area of the sugar where it will be attached by holding it over an open flame until tiny air bubbles form in the melted sugar. To produce a very strong bond, touch the pieces together after heating, slightly pull them apart, and place them together again.
Attaching sugar pieces by melting a small area of the sugar where it will be attached by holding it over an open flame until tiny air bubbles form in the melted sugar. To produce a very strong bond, touch the pieces together after heating, slightly pull them apart, and place them together again.
Attaching sugar pieces by melting a small area of the sugar where it will be attached by holding it over an open flame until tiny air bubbles form in the melted sugar. To produce a very strong bond, touch the pieces together after heating, slightly pull them apart, and place them together again.
To avoid crystallization when cooking the sugar syrup, use a clean pastry brush to wash the inside walls of the pot above the sugar syrup with water. Cool the cooked sugar to the consistency of molasses before quickly tossing over oiled metal bars to form long, fine threads. Shape while pliable.
To avoid crystallization when cooking the sugar syrup, use a clean pastry brush to wash the inside walls of the pot above the sugar syrup with water. Immediately after the sugar and water boil, add the glucose for better incorporation. Bring back to a boil and continue cooking.
To avoid crystallization when cooking the sugar, use a clean pastry brush to wash the inside walls of the pot above the sugar with water. After cooking, let the sugar slightly thicken before pouring it into silicone molds or between oiled metal bars. Remove the molds when the sugar is set and cooled.
Coloring sugar on a silicone mat allows several different-colored sugars to be made from the same batch. Using a skewer, dab gel colorings or alcohol-based colorings into hot pools of cooked sugar. Bring the sides of the sugar toward its center to mix the colors while slightly cooling the sugar.
Stretching and folding cooked, slightly cooled sugar to achieve a satin-like consistency while adding strength. Before satinizing, evenly cool the cooked sugar on a silicone mat by gathering the edges into the center of the sugar. Sugar has cooled enough to satinize when it can hold its shape.
Gently and evenly pulling a sugar ribbon using at least two differently colored logs of satinized sugar of the same temperature and consistency. After elongating the ribbon, it can be thinned out by smoothing it against the side of the work table. Cut and shape before the sugar cools and hardens.
Using satinized sugar with a soft enough consistency to allow it to be pulled and stay bright once set, but not so soft that it cannot hold a shape. Stretch the satinized sugar to make a thin edge from which to pull the leaf. Use scissors to cut off the pulled sugar leaf. Pulled sugar cools quickly.
Using satinized sugar with a soft enough consistency to allow it to be pulled and stay bright once set but not so soft that it cannot hold a shape. Stretch the satinized sugar to make a thin edge from which to pull the petal. Use scissors to cut off the pulled sugar petal. Pulled sugar cools quickly.
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