14 Scoring

Resembling a stalk of wheat, an epi is formed by using scissors to cut a baguette at regular intervals, alternately shifting the pieces far enough left and right so that after baking the epi will have defined "leaves."
Scoring pan bread by cutting a single score down the center of the fully proofed loaf while holding the sharp, thin blade at a 90 degree angle. Make sure to cut all the way from one end of the loaf to the other so the score will open uniformly, resulting in an even loaf of bread.
When transferring the loaves onto the loader, make sure to leave enough space in between the loaves to shape the flames. Using a bench knife, cleanly cut through the center of each loaf creating two uniform halves connected at the top and bottom. Pull apart the two halves to form a flame shape.
Scores on a baguette should be cut in a nearly straight line in the center third of the baguette, nearly parallel to the side of the loaf, using a thin, sharp blade held at a shallow angle to create an "ear," with each score overlapping the previous score by one third.
Score baguettes 5-7 times in a nearly straight line in the center third of the loaf, nearly parallel to the side of the loaf, with a thin, sharp blade held at a shallow angle to create an "ear." Scores overlapping by less than one-third will not open properly, resulting in a less attractive loaf of bread.
Score baguettes 5-7 times in a nearly straight line in the center third of the loaf, nearly parallel to the side of the loaf, with a thin, sharp blade held at a shallow angle to create an "ear." Scores that are not cut nearly parallel will not openly properly, resulting in a less attractive loaf of bread.
Score baguettes 5-7 times in a nearly straight line in the center third of the loaf, nearly parallel to the side of the loaf, with a thin, sharp blade held at a shallow angle to create an "ear." Each score should overlap the previous score by one third. When scored incorrectly, the cuts will not open properly, resulting in a less attractive loaf of bread.
When scoring, it is important to use a sharp, thin blade, cutting with a quick motion, avoiding dragging the blade, making the scores even in length and depth. . Scores parallel to the side of the loaf create a flatter cross-section whereas more perpendicular scores create a rounder cross-section.
Using a sharp, thin blade, cleanly score the dough without dragging the blade. To maintain a round shape after baking, use a circle, box or polka score so the bread expands evenly in all directions. Scoring parallel lines will cause the bread to expand in a more linear fashion, becoming more oval in shape.
Using a sharp, thin blade, cleanly score the dough without dragging the blade. To maintain a round shape after baking, use a circle or box score so the bread expands evenly in all directions.
When scoring the corn and pear breads, use stencils and various scoring to replicate either a corn kernel or a pear. Cutting several small scores on either side of the breads while holding the blade at a 90 degree angle will promote better volume and a rounder cross-section in the baked loaves of bread.
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