12 Shaping French Regional Breads

Shaping a Charleston by rolling two well-defined X's on both sides of a batard while using just enough dusting flour to prevent the dough from sticking to the rolling pin or table.
Oiling the edges of a very thinly rolled piece of dough, cut and stretched over six boules arranged in a circle, creates a thin, distinct "lip" that releases from the rest of the loaf during baking. Proofing the shaped loaf seam-side up maintains the tenderness of the dough's skin, preventing it from drying out and cracking.
Rolling the center of a batard to form two distinct thick sections of dough connected by a thin piece which are then brought together to form a "split" loaf of bread. Proofing the shaped loaf with the open side down maintains the tenderness of the dough's skin, preventing it from drying out and cracking.
Shaped by forming a fendu, curving it into a horseshoe, and placing it open-side down into a basket that has been floured, to form a decorative pattern and prevent sticking. Proofing the shaped loaf open side down maintains the tenderness of the dough's skin, preventing it from drying out and cracking.
Forming a flower shaped bread by placing a small boule in the center of a larger boule that has been divided using a rolling pin into six distinct sections, or "petals." Proofing the fleur upside down maintains the tenderness of the dough'&s skin, preventing it from drying out and cracking.
Oiling the edge of the thinly rolled section of the boule before folding it over the rest of the boule will form a distinct "lip" that releases from the bowtie-shaped loaf during baking. Proofing the loaf upside down maintains the tenderness of the dough's skin, preventing it from drying out and cracking.
Oiling the edge of a thinly rolled section of the boule before folding it over the rest of the boule forms a distinct "lip" that releases from the shaped loaf during baking to form a tobacco-pouch-shaped bread. Proofing the bread upside down maintains the tenderness of the dough's skin, preventing it from drying out and cracking.
Rolling the center of a batard to form two distinct thick sections of dough connected by a thin piece, which are then brought together and twisted in opposite directions. Proofing the tordu upside down maintains the tenderness of the dough's skin, preventing it from drying out and cracking.
Cutting two X's side-by-side on a batard, making sure to cut entirely through the dough, so the pattern will remain defined after baking. Proofing the vivarais upside down maintains the tenderness of the dough's skin, preventing it from drying out and cracking.
© San Francisco Baking Institute | Photography by Frank Wing, Joe Burns, Steve Hunt, Latvis Photography and SFBI staff
Web development by Avalon Media Group