Saving Time in the Bakery

Deciding to own or even just work in a bakery has traditionally destined the baker to a life of long hours in the middle of the night. Motivated by the desire to have a friendlier schedule and workload, techniques such as retarding and freezing are used more and more. One way to lighten the load in the bakery, especially in smaller operations with limited employees, is to cross utilize the staple preparations.

Croissant dough is a perfect example of how this works. It is a classic product that, in its best forms, reveals subtle fermentation, a honeycomb interior, pure butter flavor, and a light flaky texture. Sounds good right? So why not use the same dough for more than just croissants?

In a bakery that makes croissants, Danish, bear claws, cinnamon rolls, sticky buns, and a variety of sweet rolls, all can be made with croissant. Unlike the simple croissant, these other products have fillings and glazes which generally have more of an impact on the consumer’s buying decision than whether or not the Danish is made from a true Danish dough.

You can even add a small percentage of eggs to the croissant to give it more body and richness. It will still be suitable for croissants and work great for everything else. If it tastes great the customer may even like it better and the baker gets to save himself a lot of work!

San Francisco Baking Institute


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