27 Puff Pastry Method

Mix on first speed just until all the ingredients are fully incorporated since the dough develops its strength through lamination. Puff pastry is laminated using a minimum of four single folds, but no more than six single folds. Adding butter to the dough adds flavor while lemon juice adds elasticity.
Using the basic method of fat enclosure, sheet the traditional puff pastry dough to twice the length of the butter, place the butter block (which has the same plasticity as the dough) in the center of the dough, and fold the dough over the butter, creating two layers of dough and one layer of butter.
When folding puff pastry dough, sheet the dough quickly yet gradually in the direction of the open ends so the fat and dough extend evenly and maintain a rectangular form until the dough's length is three times its width. Fold into thirds, forming one single fold.
Thoroughly mixing butter and flour together to create a sheetable, pliable butter mixture with good plasticity that does not soften easily. After mixing, roll the butter mixture between heavy plastic sheets into a rectangle of an even thickness and chill before using.
Laminating inverted puff pastry by enclosing the dough within the butter mixture to create a more tender puff pastry with short, flaky layers. When folding, sheet quickly, yet gradually, in the direction of the open ends so the fat and dough extend evenly and maintain a rectangular form.
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