35 Meringue

Adding one-third of the sugar to the room-temperature liquid egg whites and whipping until a peak forms that holds a soft shape. Add the remaining sugar. Whip until fully incorporated and the meringue is smooth and shiny. Soft peak meringue can be used for chiffon cakes or baking a dry meringue.
Adding one-third of the sugar to the room-temperature liquid egg whites and whipping until a peak forms that retain its shape but slightly droops. Add the remaining sugar. Whip until fully incorporated and the meringue is smooth and shiny. Medium peak meringue can be used for making sponge cakes.
Adding one-third of the sugar to room-temperature liquid egg whites and whipping until a peak forms that retains a sharp edge. Add the remaining sugar. Whip until fully incorporated and the meringue has a smooth, shiny texture and tight emulsion. Stiff peak meringue maintains sharp visual lines when piped.
Heat egg whites and sugar over a hot water bath before whipping to fully dissolve the sugar, creating a smooth, dense, stable meringue after whipping that is used for cookies, cakes, pies and buttercream. Constantly stirring the whites and sugar while heating helps to quickly dissolve the sugar.
To avoid crystallization when cooking the sugar syrup, use a clean pastry brush to wash the inside walls of the pot above the sugar syrup with water. Pour the cooked sugar down the side of the mixing bowl to evenly introduce the sugar into the whipping egg whites. Whip until cool.
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