2 Dough Mixing

Mixing bread dough using the short mix method. Similar to hand mixing, short mixing produces a flavorful bread with a very creamy, very open crumb. This bread has an increased shelf-life because the gently mixed, soft dough has very little oxidation and needs a long fermentation time with folding to build strength, while at the same time developing flavor.
100 percent whole grain bread is very nutritious because it contains the entire ground grain. However, the high content of bran can cut the gluten, so dough with 100% whole grains is mixed until it feels elastic and a weak gluten window forms.
Soaking wheat berries to hydrate, soften, and begin sprouting so the berries can be ground and used for making bread or stored in the freezer to use at a later time.
Adding ground, sprouted wheat berries to a dough produces a bread that is more easily digested and nutritious because the whole wheat berry is sprouted before using. But, the high bran content will cut through the gluten, so this dough is mixed until it feels elastic and a weak gluten window forms.
Comparing the effect of how a dough is mixed on the crumb texture, crumb color, crust color, overall volume, and flavor of the bread. Flavor is developed during fermentation, so a short-mixed bread is more flavorful than an improved-mixed bread which is more flavorful than an intensive-mixed bread.
Mixing bread dough using the improved mix method. A compromise between short and intensive mixing, improved mixing produces a flavorful bread with a creamy, open crumb and good shelf life. It can be produced using semi-mechanized processes as the medium-soft dough is mixed to half-development and needs only a slightly long fermentation time.
Mixing bread dough using the intensive mix method. Intensive mixing produces a fully developed dough that needs only a short fermentation time before shaping. This method is ideal for stiffer doughs used for mechanized processes and results in a bread with high volume and a white uniform crumb, but less flavor.
Using the double hydration technique to mix a very soft bread dough with a high hydration and sufficient strength without increasing mixing time.
Mixing bread dough using an autolyse to develop flavor, shorten mixing time, increase extensibility and improve dough machinability.
Mixing bread dough using an autolyse to develop flavor, shorten mixing time, increase extensibility and improve dough machinability.
Mixing bread dough using an autolyse to develop flavor, shorten mixing time, increase extensibility and improve dough machinability.
Using a high content of rye flour and a sourdough starter results in a bread with a complex flavor but fairly compact, uniform crumb as rye flour contains only a small amount of gluten, creating a weaker dough that is mixed only to an improved level.
100 percent rye produces a peppery flavored bread with a compact, even crumb as rye flour contains only a small amount of gluten and cannot be mixed to an improved or intensive level, so the sticky, clay-like dough feels slightly elastic when fully mixed.
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