42 Confections

To avoid crystallization when cooking the sugar, use a clean pastry brush to wash the inside walls of the pot above the sugar with water. After cooking, methodically agitating the sugar while cooling forms many very fine crystals that combined create an opaque color. Store the fondant in an airtight container.
Using a combination of gelatin, egg whites, and sugar to create a light aerated marshmallow that is deposited into molds and cleanly cut using an oiled knife. After cutting, the marshmallows are preserved by coating in a starch mixture. Marshmallows can also be made using only sugar and gelatin.
Creating a dense, aerated confection by whipping soft peak meringue and cooked honey, and incorporating a cooked sugar syrup and the remaining ingredients using a paddle, because the stiff mixture will get stuck in the whip. Nougat in France is soft to medium-hard but in Italy, it is hard and brittle.
Pate de fruit has a slightly firm texture and an opaque or translucent appearance depending on the type of fruit used, but it should always have a slight shine and a very thin crust. A thin crust is attained by maturing the pate de fruit in sugar for 24 hours after it has been cooked, cooled and cut.
Cook a sugar syrup to high temperature before adding in nuts, then stir constantly to prevent the nuts from scorching as the mixture takes on a caramel color. Remove from heat and add baking soda to the mixture, which lightens its texture and allows the layer of brittle to be thick, yet still edible.
© San Francisco Baking Institute | Photography by Frank Wing, Joe Burns, Steve Hunt, Latvis Photography and SFBI staff
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